The arguments about climate change, and whether or not it is the most urgent issue of our time, will probably never really be settled. While we are arguing about it down here... there is somebody “up-there” approaching the issue from above.  

According to NASA’s weekly ‘Explore’ newsletter, recognizing that climate change is an urgent global challenge, the space agency has formed a strategic partnership with the European Space Agency, or ESA, so that it can observe Earth and its changing environment. The agency says that together, NASA and the ESA are leading and supporting a global response, with combined efforts in Earth science. 

The partnership between the two agencies was formalized through a joint statement of intent, which was recently signed. The statement outlines how the agencies will collaborate to ensure continuity of Earth observations; advancing the understanding of the Earth System, climate change, and application of that knowledge; and collaboration on an open data policy that promotes open sharing of data, information, and knowledge within the scientific community and the wider public. 

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Climate change is an all-hands-on-deck, global challenge that requires action now... NASA and ESA are leading the way in space, building an unprecedented strategic partnership in Earth science. ~ NASA Administrator Bill Nelson 

 

NASA says that climate adaptation and mitigation efforts will not be able to succeed without climate observations and research. To that end, the agency has more than two dozen satellites and instruments observing how the Earth is changing and measuring key climate indicators, such as the height of oceans and inland waters, clouds and precipitation, and carbon dioxide. 

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

READ ON: See the States Where People Live the Longest

Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

Read on to learn the average life expectancy in each state.

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