You may be wondering what that burning plastic smell is throughout Berkshire County. Members of local Facebook groups are certainly wondering what it is as some folks have posted that very question.

In a recent Facebook post, the Great Barrington Fire Department explained the reason for the smell. The following was posted on July 26 at 12:31 p.m.

Throughout the Southern Berkshires there have been reports of strange odors and a burning plastic smell - along with the visible haze. It is our understanding and belief that this condition is because of the wild fires in the western part of the country. This is being monitored and proper warnings (air quality) will be issued if appropriate by the National Weather Service. Please do not become complacent - if your smoke detectors activate, leave your home and call 911 - the atmospheric conditions are not enough to cause a smoke detector to go off. Enjoy the anticipated colorful sunset and call us if you need us, we'll be here for you!

According to a recent article in Newsweek, there are currently 86 active large fires burning across 12 U.S. states, as more than 22,200 wildland firefighters and incident management teams are battling the blazes that have so far burned 1,498,205 acres, with that figure expected to reach 1.5 million on Monday.

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There was comment I found interesting in the Great Community Board Facebook group which was "Literally half the country is on fire. This is a direct result of that unfortunately. Bad for breathing. Great for beautiful sunsets."

At least we know the reason for the smell.

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