Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker is reminding and encouraging Massachusetts residents who are fully vaccinated to get a COVID-19 booster six months after receiving the second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines or two months since receiving a Johnson & Johnson single-dose vaccine. The reminder comes now that state residents aged 18 and over are now eligible to receive the booster.

Booster doses can be mixed and matched...

According to a media release from the governor's office, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention says that mixing and matching of different COVID-19 booster doses is recommended and eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a booster dose. This can be done at any of the Commonwealth's more than 1000 vaccine locations.

Scheduling your vaccine booster is easy. Here's what you do, according to the governor's office...

 

  1. Visit the Vaxfinder tool at vaxfinder.mass.gov for a full list of locations to receive a booster. Residents are able to narrow results to search for locations that are offering boosters. Many locations will be booking appointments out weeks in advance.
  2. For individuals who are unable to use Vaxfinder, or have difficulty accessing the internet, the COVID-19 Vaccine Resource Line (Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM to 6:00 PM, Saturday and Sunday 9AM-2PM) by calling 2-1-1 and following the prompts is available for assistance. The COVID-19 Vaccine Resource Line is available in English and Spanish and has translators available in approximately 100 additional languages.
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One thing is for certain, lack of access to the vaccine is no longer a valid reason for the vast majority of state residents not to get their booster. Vaccines are widely available across Massachusetts and the governor's office and the CDC contend that getting vaccinated remains the most important thing individuals can do to protect themselves, their families, and their community from coronavirus.

Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.

LOOK: Here is the richest town in each state

Just saying the names of these towns immediately conjures up images of grand mansions, luxury cars, and ritzy restaurants. Read on to see which town in your home state took the title of the richest location and which place had the highest median income in the country. Who knows—your hometown might even be on this list.

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.