When it comes to holiday tunes, people fall into several categories:

  • Those who enjoy Christmas music on December 24 and 25, and that's about it
  • Those who like a little musical good cheer starting around two weeks before Christmas Day
  • Those who are ready for it right around when Thanksgiving ends...and Black Friday begins
  • And then there are the brave(or crazy?) ones who are ready for holiday music right around "Christmas In July"

Well, believe it or not, there's a bar in Dallas, Texas that's going to limit plays on Christmas music. Actually, one Christmas song in particular. You know the one. Sung by Mariah Carey? Yeah. That one.

A tweet showing a photo of a sign with rules concerning when Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas is You” can play at this Dallas bar is going viral. The sign reads “All I Want For Christmas Is You will be skipped if played before Dec. 1. After Dec. 1 the song is only allowed one time a night.”

According to CNN, the bar's general manager, Laura Garrison, says that she doesn’t hate Mariah Carey and she doesn’t hate Christmas, it’s just that the customers play the song way too much and way too soon before the holiday.

Mariah Carey, for her part, is not having it. One Twitter user asked, quote, "Is this the war on Christmas I've heard about?" Mariah Carey herself responded with a picture of her in armor as though she's going to battle.

For more on the story, visit CNN's website here.

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