The warm weather is finally here and we've seen mother nature out in full force recently.

It seems like bears are everywhere right now, but Michael Maffuccio, Honda Finance Manager at Bedard Brothers, and his wife Vanna received a few visits from a moose last week. The couple and their children live in Becket, where I believe it's fair to say they see a little more wildlife action than those of us who live in more populated areas.

According to Mass Wildlife, historically, moose roamed the forests of Massachusetts. However, by the early 1700s, unregulated hunting and extensive forest clearing for pastures and farming by early settlers led to their disappearance. Moose began to appear again in greater numbers in Massachusetts starting around the 1980s, expanding south from neighboring states.

Moose are the largest members of the deer family in North America. An adult cow (female) moose can weigh from 500 to 700 pounds in the fall, and a bull (male) moose can weigh from 600 to over 1,000 pounds. They can stand up to 6 feet tall at the shoulder and have long legs 3–4 feet in length, which allow them to walk in deep snow.

Moose are an important natural resource in Massachusetts and their recent return is a testament to the state’s high-quality wildlife habitat and management.

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Moose are bashful animals that usually run away when you encounter them. But they can also be quite surly and hard to read when you encounter them. Males can become very aggressive during rutting season (September-October), while females tend to be very protective of young calves.

If you encounter a moose, your best bet is just to let it be. If a moose is in front of your car, blocking the road, don’t drive toward it threateningly or honk at it. Just be patient. It will move along eventually. Don’t try to chase a moose that’s running along a road either, because this will only agitate it and may result in injury to the animal.

Check out the Maffuccio's footage of their moose below.

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LOOK: Here are the 50 best beach towns in America

Every beach town has its share of pluses and minuses, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best one to live in. To find out, Stacker consulted data from WalletHub, released June 17, 2020, that compares U.S. beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The cities ranged in population from 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From those rankings, we selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will be unsurprised to learn that many of towns featured here are in one of those two states.

Keep reading to see if your favorite beach town made the cut.